Outdoor living-Ness Lake

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Outdoor living-Ness Lake

Post by Hortons Heroes on Thu Dec 20, 2007 1:21 pm

Day-1- set-up camp
Day 2-Shelters
Day 3-compass day-DO FOR DAY 2 WITH INTERMEDIATES
Day 4-Hike/Teach Bandages
Skill Outlines
Day 1-Setting up the camp
ATTENDANCE
Introduction of yourselves and the nature study skill

Bring out the tents from the canoe cove shack. Split the campers up into groups of three or four. Give them these goals.
-set-up your tent in a good spot
-set-up a bag in the tent(should be in the canoe cove)
-set-up a blanket in the tent
-set-up a fake fire ring of rocks in your area

TEACH THIS TENT TERMINOLOGY
-POLES are the frame that gives the tent it’s shape. You can’t pull a pole you have to push them. They can be fragile and if they bend they become useless
-SHELL-the material shell. Keeps heat in, bugs out and you off of the ground. Allot of the time they have mesh windows to help keep the tent from over heating and to keep the bugs out.
-FLY-to keep the weather out of your tent. It’s important to keep the fly tight so that water does not pool or soak through to the occupants.
-SPIKES-keep the fly tight and the tent planted in the ground so that it doesn’t move or float.

PUTTING IT TOGETHER-first thing to do is get the poles together. Then hook the poles into the loops into the corners (some tents you need to feed the poles through guides first.) Clip the Shell to the poles them get your fly on and tighten it so that it has as little contact with the shell as possible.

Give them some tips before they set-up like
What if it rains?
Where do you want to store food?

When they are done mark them based on a scale like this
Is the tent in a place where water will pool?
Is the tent away from the fire so that it will not be damaged?
Is there anything touching the walls of the tent? When is rains anything touching the walls will get soaked
Does the tent have some natural cover?
Is the fire underneath tree?
Are there any dangers around the fire?
Is the tent on flat ground?
Are there any root or anything like that under the tent?

Take time to wander between groups and help them. Let kids into the tents without shoes on so they can test out each others campsites.

Day 2 Building shelters
Bible Lesson: “He who dwells in the shelter of the Most High will rest in the shadow of the Almighty. I will say of the Lord, “He is my refuge and my fortress, my God, in whom I trust.” – Psalm 91:1&2
Explain how God is our shelter and we are safe from all things as long as we take refuge in him.

Why build shelter?
Give shade
Repel wind, rain
Keep in warmth

Where do you think would be a bad place to build a shelter and why?
Hilltops, right beside water, open fields-these places are open to wind which is extremely hard to block.
Valley bottoms hold cooler air in and are the first places to take frost.
Hillside terraces where the ground hold moisture
Animal routes to water or other resources. Set-up away from where animals pass.

What things to find when looking to set-up your shelter
Risen area that will not flood if it rains
Safe from falling trees, land slides etc
Out of the wind
Nearby water
Near a source of wood

The Type of shelter you build will depend of what environment you are in
Open Plains-Dig a hole and pile objects on the wind side. Keep your back to the wind
Bough shelters-take an existing fallen tree or low branch (needle tree) to create some cover.
Root/natural shelter-build a roof to an existing depression or hole. Be careful to build a trench so that water runoff does not go into your shelter

What make a good shelter
Evergreen branches repel water better than leaves and last longer as well
Use your jacket a door to your shelter
The shelter should just barely be big enough for you to fit inside so that it retains heat well.

Split the kids up into two groups and make some shelters.
Day 3 Compass training-GET SCRAP PAPER FROM OFFICE CO-ORDINATOR.
Bible Lesson: “A man’s steps are directed by the Lord. How then can anyone understand his own way?” – Proverbs 20:24
-explain that it is only by God that we are able to find our way through life and only with his help. He has made a path for is and we are to follow it with his direction and help.
ATTENDANCE
Compass orienteering (learn how to use one!)
Hand out compasses to the kids and give lesson on proper care and use of a compass, as well as the importance. If you can find some history on the compass that would be good to.
Notes to know: take off watches rings and bracelets
Stay away from power lines






Parts of the compass
TOP SIGHT-used to sight in your landmark

SIGHTING MIRROR-used to view the compass needle and housing

SIGHTING LINE-used to make precise bearing readings

HOUSING-spins to line up the north arrow with the needle

DIRECTIONAL MARK-lines up with sighting line to get your directional bearing

NEEDLE-magnetic arrow that points north when level

SCALE RULER-used in reading maps for distances

MAGNIFYING GLASS-used to read small details on maps









To Use a Compass:

Basics of using a compass (HAVE EVERYONE DO THESE THINGS)
-take off jewellery on hands and wrist
-hold compass flat in you hand so the base is thinnest in your vision
-ensure it is flat so the needle can spin free

To take a bearing
-Pick a landmark
-turn the housing until the red arrow in the compass housing lines up with the magnetic arrow
-take number that lines up with the sighting line
-make sure you are reading the number farthest from you

TEST THEIR BEARING TAKING SKILLS-have them stand close together. Take a bearing way off in the distance of a tree top, house, deadhead etc. Tell them the bearing them have them find what you were looking at. Correct those who were unable to answer the questions right.

To follow a bearing
-turn the housing to the discard degree on the mark
-holding the compass in front of you turn until the red arrows line up
-go in that direction, keeping an eye on compass, to make sure you are not straying.

-practice finding different points/places
Set up three or four places close by for them to find.
Paces
-a pace is two steps.
100meters is 66 steps
50 meters is 33 steps
25 metes is 16.5

Here is the course that we are using this year. It is marked with orange flagging tape. The next step should be pretty clear when you are looking around. Take this sheet with you so that if a flag falls off that you can find your way around still. All trees are marked by an orange flagging tape at head or higher level.

You can give campers scrap paper and have them write out their degrees and paces them compare once everyone returns. Release them a few mins after each other so they don’t bump into each other. Other option is to go as a group and have people call out what they think they have for each leg then give your answer. Some of the degrees may be off so please fix them on this sheet or tell the program director.


STEP 1-130degrees, 26 paces
STEP 2-48 degrees, 15 paces
STEP 3-66 degrees, 31 paces
STEP 4-310 degrees, 17 paces
STEP 5-300 degrees, 15 paces
STEP 6-70 degrees, 34 paces
STEP 7-340 degrees, 33 paces
STEP 8-58 degrees, 13 paces
STEP 9-10 degrees, 33 paces
STEP 10- 258 degrees, 51 paces
You should end up close to the craft hall

Start point is the clump of birch by the road at canoe cove.


Last edited by on Fri Feb 08, 2008 5:01 pm; edited 1 time in total
Hortons Heroes
Hortons Heroes

Number of posts : 130
Organization Name : Ness Lake Bible Camp
Postion : Program Director
Name : Dave Horton
Registration date : 2007-12-20

View user profile http://nlbc.bc.ca/

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Re: Outdoor living-Ness Lake

Post by Hortons Heroes on Fri Feb 08, 2008 5:00 pm

DAY 4-nature study day

Bible Lesson: Variety of what God’s created. How God’s glory and character are seen in creation.
Psalm 104
Genesis 1:1

ATTENDANCE
Make sure you take some of the first aid stuff with you so that you can fake some injuries during the trip and have campers fix each other up.

Discuss the sort of items that you would bring on a hike with you. Let the kids guess if they can.
-Water -Compass
-Rain Gear -Good Shoes
-Snacks for the day
(Explain the best sort of food to bring with them)

Take a moment to let them know about the different wildlife around camp. (Mice, Squirrels, bats, Moose, Deer, Bear, Foxes and coyotes)
Do you know what to do about animals in the forest?
Make noise, animals become aggressive if they are surprised. Making noise with bells, clapping, and singing make sure that the animal knows you are coming and usually scares it off.
If you do startle an animal don’t turn around and run away. Keep facing the animal, make yourself bigger by raising you arms, make some noise, and stay close together as a group. Slowly back away and take a different route.
Animals become very aggressive if they are protecting their young or a food source. You can’t always see why the animal is in your way so if it will not retreat take a different route or cancel your trip.

On your trip make a stop and “injure” someone. Draw a cut on a few kids and give someone a hurt leg and hurt arm with flagging tape. With the supplies that you have in your first aid stuff they need to splint the leg, cover the cuts and sling the arm.

Go on a hike!!!

Bible Lesson: Hebrews 4:13 “Nothing in all creation is hidden from God’s sight.”
Because God created everything, nothing can hide from him, not even the smallest of insects on earth. As you go on your hike point out different things that are hidden from the human eye but are visible to God.


OPTIONS FOR TRAILS-blueberry trail (recommended), trail behind Screefs to the homestead, low ropes course not recommended, to distracting.

Stop every couple of minutes and take a look around for a bit, guaranteed you will see something new if you stop and look around.


(0-15) Make sure they are all wearing the proper foot wear and gear (water bottle if have one).

(15-60) Go on a hike. Point out things on your hike as you see them.
I.e.: Animal droppings, animal scraping on the trees, different plant life and their names, berries, different trees and so on. Make sure you are back in time to get to next activity.



Packing a Bag (rainy day option)

Bible Lesson:

RUBBER MAID BIN FULL OF RANDOM STUFF. SEE WHAT KIDS WOULD PACK. MAKE THREE BINS THAT ALL HAVE THE SAME STUFF WITH THREE PACKS.
Old boot (good shape) new boots (never worn), poly shirt, cotton shirt, fleece jacket, rubber rain jacket, boonie hat (tillie), base ball hat, big heavy jacket,

Sleeping Bags
Sleeping bags are rated for different temperatures. Styles include rectangle and mummy bags. Mummy bags fit snug, have hoods, and take up less room. Because they are smaller they take less energy to heat.

Loading and wearing a backpack
Packs must be strong and well fitting. The secret to carrying a heavy load is to wear the weight on your hips. The back and shoulders are not very strong compared to the waist and they can tire and get sore very quickly. With the waist strap on the pack shouldn’t sit on the back and there should be a little room between the back and the pack for air to help vent.

Put all the weight in the centre of the pack so that one side doesn’t have to do more work. Don’t try and balance heavy objects on either side of a bag centre them with the lightest on the outside.

Sleeping bags-down (goose feathers) are light, give best insulation but if they get wet they loose all insulating qualities and are very hard to dry out.

Synthetic (hollow fill) bags are not as light but if get wet they retain their warming qualities and are easier to dry out. If you know that you are going somewhere wet use man made)

HIKE PACKING

Give your feet priority
You will be on your feet all day so take what it will take to keep them happy
Break in new boots well before


Survival Simulation Game
PHOTOCOPY THIS ON RAINY DAY
You and your companions have just survived the crash of a small plane. Both the pilot and co-pilot were killed in the crash. It is mid-January , and you are in Northern Canada. The daily temperature is 25 below zero, and the night time temperature is 40 below zero. There is snow on the ground,
and the countryside is wooded with with several creeks criss-crossing the area. The nearest town is 20 miles away. You are all dressed in city clothes appropriate for a business meeting. Your group of survivors managed to salvage the following items:

______ A ball of steel wool
______A small ax
______A loaded .45-caliber pistol
______Can of Crisco shortening
______Newspapers (one per person)
______Cigarette lighter (without fluid)
______Extra shirt and pants for each survivor
______20 x 20 ft. piece of heavy-duty canvas
______A sectional air map made of plastic
______One quart of 100-proof whiskey
______A compass
______Family-size chocolate bars (one per person)

Your task as a group is to list the above 12 items in order of importance for your survival. List the uses for each. You MUST come to agreement as a group.

Survival Simulation Game
You and your companions have just survived the crash of a small plane. Both the pilot and co-pilot were killed in the crash. It is mid-January , and you are in Northern Canada. The daily temperature is 25 below zero, and the night time temperature is 40 below zero. There is snow on the ground,
and the countryside is wooded with with several creeks criss-crossing the area. The nearest town is 20 miles away. You are all dressed in city clothes appropriate for a business meeting. Your group of survivors managed to salvage the following items:

______ A ball of steel wool
______A small ax
______A loaded .45-caliber pistol
______Can of Crisco shortening
______Newspapers (one per person)
______Cigarette lighter (without fluid)
______Extra shirt and pants for each survivor
______20 x 20 ft. piece of heavy-duty canvas
______A sectional air map made of plastic
______One quart of 100-proof whiskey
______A compass
______Family-size chocolate bars (one per person)

Your task as a group is to list the above 12 items in order of importance for your survival. List the uses for each. You MUST come to agreement as a group.

EXPLANATION

Mid-January is the coldest time of year in Northern Canada. The first problem the survivors face is the preservation of body heat and the protection against its loss. This problem can be solved by building a fire, minimizing movement and exertion, using as much insulation as possible, and
constructing a shelter.

The participants have just crash-landed. Many individuals tend to overlook the enormous shock reaction this has on the human body, and the deaths of the pilot and co-pilot increases the shock. Decision-making under such circumstances is extremely difficult. Such a situation requires a strong
emphasis on the use of reasoning for making decisions and for reducing fear and panic. Shock would be shown in the survivors by feelings of helplessness, loneliness, hopelessness, and fear. These feelings have brought about more fatalities than perhaps any other cause in survival situations. Certainly the state of shock means the movement of the survivors should be at a minimum, and that an attempt to calm them should be made.

Before taking off, a pilot has to file a flight plan which contains vital information such as the course, speed, estimated time of arrival, type of aircraft, and number of passengers. Search-and-rescue operations begin shortly after the failure of a plane to appear at its destination at the estimated time of arrival.

The 20 miles to the nearest town is a long walk under even ideal conditions, particularly if one is not used to walking such distances. In this situation, the walk is even more difficult due to shock, snow, dress, and water barriers. It would mean almost certain death from freezing and exhaustion. At temperatures of minus 25 to minus 40, the loss of body heat through exertion is a very serious matter.

Once the survivors have found ways to keep warm, their next task is to attract the attention of search planes. Thus, all the items the group has salvaged must be assessed for their value in signaling the group’s whereabouts.

The ranking of the survivors items was made by Mark Wanvig, a former instructor in survival training for the Reconnaissance School of the 101st Division of the U.S. Army. Mr. Wanvig currently conducts wilderness survival training programs in the Minneapolis, Minnesota area. This
survival simulation game is used in military training classrooms.

RANKINGS

1. Cigarette lighter (without fluid)
The gravest danger facing the group is exposure to cold. The greatest need is for a source of warmth and the second greatest need is for signaling devices. This makes building a fire the first order of business. Without matches, something is needed to produce sparks, and even without fluid, a
cigarette lighter can do that.

2. Ball of steel wool
To make a fire, the survivors need a means of catching he sparks made by the cigarette lighter. This is the best substance for catching a spark and supporting a flame, even if the steel wool is a little wet.

3. Extra shirt and pants for each survivor
Besides adding warmth to the body, clothes can also be used for shelter, signaling, bedding, bandages, string (when unraveled), and fuel for the fire.

4. Can of Crisco shortening
This has many uses. A mirror-like signaling device can be made from the lid. After shining the lid with steel wool, it will reflect sunlight and generate 5 to 7 million candlepower. This is bright enough to be seen beyond the horizon. While this could be limited somewhat by the trees, a member of the
group could climb a tree and use the mirrored lid to signal search planes. If they had no other means of signaling than this, they would have a better than 80% chance of being rescued within the first day.
There are other uses for this item. It can be rubbed on exposed skin for protection against the cold. When melted into an oil, the shortening is helpful as fuel. When soaked into a piece of cloth, melted shortening will act like a candle. The empty can is useful in melting snow for drinking water. It is much safer to drink warmed water than to eat snow, since warm water will help retain body heat. Water is important because dehydration will affect decision-making. The can is also useful as a cup.

5. 20 x 20 foot piece of canvas
The cold makes shelter necessary, and canvas would protect against wind and snow (canvas is used in making tents). Spread on a frame made of trees, it could be used as a tent or a wind screen. It might also be used as a ground cover to keep the survivors dry. It’s shape, when contrasted with the surrounding terrain, makes it a signaling device.

6. Small ax
Survivors need a constant supply of wood in order to maintain the fire. The ax could be used for this as well as for clearing a sheltered campsite, cutting tree branches for ground insulation, and constructing a frame for the canvas tent.

7. Family size chocolate bars (one per person)
Chocolate will provide some food energy. Since it contains mostly carbohydrates, it supplies the energy without making digestive demands on the body.

8. Newspapers (one per person)
These are useful in starting a fire. They can also be used as insulation under clothing when rolled up and placed around a person’s arms and legs. A newspaper can also be used as a verbal signaling device when rolled up in a megaphone-shape. It could also provide reading material for recreation.

9. Loaded .45-caliber pistol
The pistol provides a sound-signaling device. (The international distress signal is 3 shots fired in rapid succession). There have been numerous cases of survivors going undetected because they were too weak to make a loud enough noise to attract attention. The butt of the pistol could be used as a
hammer, and the powder from the shells will assist in fire building. By placing a small bit of cloth in a cartridge emptied of its bullet, one can start a fire by firing the gun at dry wood on the ground. The pistol also has some serious disadvantages. Anger, frustration, impatience, irritability, and lapses of rationality may increase as the group awaits rescue. The availability of a lethal weapon is a danger to the group under these conditions. Although a pistol could be used in hunting, it would take an expert marksman to kill an animal with it. Then the animal would have to be transported to the crash site, which could prove difficult to impossible depending on its size.

10. Quart of 100 proof whiskey
The only uses of whiskey are as an aid in fire building and as a fuel for a torch (made by soaking a piece of clothing in the whiskey and attaching it to a tree branch). The empty bottle could be used for storing water. The danger of whiskey is that someone might drink it, thinking it would bring
warmth. Alcohol takes on the temperature it is exposed to, and a drink of minus 30 degrees ahrenheit whiskey would freeze a person’s esophagus and stomach. Alcohol also dilates the blood vessels in the skin, resulting in chilled blood belong carried back to the heart, resulting in a rapid loss of
body heat. Thus, a drunk person is more likely to get hypothermia than a sober person is.

11. Compass
Because a compass might encourage someone to try to walk to the nearest town, it is a dangerous item. It’s only redeeming feature is that it could be used as a reflector of sunlight (due to its glass top).

12. Sectional air map made of plastic
This is also among the least desirable of the items because it will encourage individuals to try to walk to the nearest town. It’s only useful feature is as a ground cover to keep someone dry.

How to score
Each team should list its top 5 choices in order prior to seeing the answer sheet. To award points, look at the ranking numbers on this answer sheet. Award points to each team’s top choices according to the numbers here. For example, the map would earn 12 points, while the steel wool would earn 2
points. Lowest score wins (and survives).
Hortons Heroes
Hortons Heroes

Number of posts : 130
Organization Name : Ness Lake Bible Camp
Postion : Program Director
Name : Dave Horton
Registration date : 2007-12-20

View user profile http://nlbc.bc.ca/

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